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A WARM WELCOME

to the new website of the
ASSOCIATION OF COMPLEMENTARY ANIMAL THERAPIES
This new website should be responsive in ALL sizes of browser.

Why choose an ACAT registered practitioner?

Puppy eats stethoscope! The aims of ACAT are to lead and support the provision of a professional and caring service in the complementary animal health sector.
In order to foster best practice and high quality care to all animals receiving treatment:
  1. Animals must not be treated without prior veterinary approval/referral, and a diagnosis must not be offered unless the member is qualified to do so.
  2. A current Public Liability and Malpractice Insurance must be held.
  3. In order to update best practice, annual Continuous Professional Development must be completed and recorded.
  4. Members will have completed a qualification that has been approved by ACAT.
  5. Every patient must be treated professionally and with care and consideration.
  6. Members are required to work with other professionals in ways that are best suited for the benefit of the patient.
  7. A full consultation must be carried out and accurate records maintained.
  8. The chosen course of treatment and expected outcomes must be explained in a clear and precise manner.
  9. Client confidentiality must be respected and members must abide by the Data Protection Act.
  10. All of our members are bound by our strict Code of Conduct.
Collie

ACAT Secs & Reps

Secs and Reps
Odd eyes

Why massage your animal?

Horse kneading The benefits of regular massage in humans are well known and appreciated and it is only natural that we wish to ensure our animal companions receive the best possible care too.

Regular massage sessions can offer many benefits for your animal, providing you with an indication of its overall fitness and helping prevent chronic conditions occurring.

This is especially important for working animals and those regularly competing, where their muscles, tendons and ligaments are placed under extra stress and strain.

Massage and stretching can help improve your animal's quality of life in all stages: from monitoring the developing youngster, assessing the animal during training/competition work and assisting in maintaining mobility and comfort in later life.
Painted horse

Aims of the Association

  1. To lead and support all members in developing and providing high quality innovative animal massage care.
  2. To raise the profile of the profession.
  3. To protect and further advance the interests and working lives of our members.
  4. To promote good practice amongst our members.
  5. To set appropriate standards of training and practice .
  6. To provide accreditation of courses that meet ACAT standards.
  7. To provide continual professional development seminars/training.
  8. To provide the public with a register of approved practitioner members.
Canine massage demonstration

Contact Us

For technical problems with this website:
email: techsupport@theacat.co.uk
Otherwise please use this form.




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